Brexit - The Kinetic Phase


#2668

I suspect that if the result had gone the other way, he might have continued campaigning but no one would’ve taken a blind bit of notice.


#2669

So, basically, in todays daily clusterfuck Brexit news … almost 2 years after the referendum, over a year since article 50 was invoked, the cabinet has finally gotten around to having a wee chat about which of the two already-rejected-by-Barnier options they’re going to gouge each others eyes out with.

It’s all going so jolly well.


#2670

Why the Lords are right to apply the brakes on a train-crash Brexit

An interesting article


#2671

And Why Liam Fox’s head should be on a pike on Westminster Bridge. The mouth-breathing little cunt.


#2672

It’s a decent article, but it is depressing for me that the bar in politics is set so low nowadays: being able to enunciate common sense makes you stand out from the crowd of absolute fucking morons.


#2673

I looked at the Twitter feed of our local MP, Robert Jenrick today. I don’t follow him because he is a boring cunt and I’m a born-again LibDem anyway.

However, his recent timeline was all about what a big “win” it was that the Treasury had decided not to scrap the copper coinage - 1p and 2p.

THE BIG ISSUES, LADS.


#2674

which are actually copper-plated steel, because they are not worth their weight in copper any more


#2675

Indeed. If they were copper, they’d have been reclaimed years ago :smiley:


#2676

This is great: playing politics over having integrity, it’s the way forwards


#2677

I think that article actually paints a fair picture of the coinsiderations that any opposition party would have to take.

The problem, however, isn’t the strategy: politics trumps principle most days of the week. Case in point; if David Milliband were party leader you’d (perhaps) be reluctantly accepting of this strategy cos you knew it was a means to an acceptable end.

Corbyn and Co. and their unconcealed ambivalence toward remain is the problem (for us remainers) insofar as the strategy is a vehicle toward elctoral success and brexit.


#2678

Remind me how well the Lib Dems pro-remain stance served them 12 months ago. Presumably all 16 million jumped on board?


#2679

The thing is, we know the LibDems are shit. :smiley:

Pointing out the same inconvenient truths to Jeremy’s devotees doesn’t appear to ellicit particularly high levels of self-awareness.


#2680

elicit :smiley:


#2681

Top trolling by the EU :smiley:


#2682

Will it be like an embassy ? Will they be able to give sanctuary to political dissidents ?

VB


#2683

A fair, if disengenious, point :slight_smile:

Lib Dems in whichever guise have only ever done well when fronted by a popular / charismatic leader who rises above the dregs of the debate - Clegg / Charlie / Paddy / Davids / Jeremy Thorpe

That their last two leaders have been complete and utter shite is certainly (IMHO) the prevailing reason for their piss poor showing at recent elections.

Unless you live in Taunton, you know damn well that a vote for them is, frankly, a protest vote - but strengthening the voice of one of the aforementioned can still be worth it.

This clearly isn’t the case with Farron or Thick as Mince Vince


#2684

So non popular & non charismatic leaders tend to struggle? Who’da thunk it?

Cameron, Blair, Clegg (for a while) Thatcher. Popular & charismatic.

Major, Brown, Farron, May. Neither popular nor charismatic & have certainly tended to struggle.

Corbyn isn’t especially charismatic nor terribly popular. He’ll likely struggle too. I wish they could find someone more articulate & engaging who shared his values & beliefs who wasn’t just another Blairite.


#2685

Someone who wasn’t supporting the government’s Brexit would be a start.


#2686

Out of interest, did you vote for Cameron in 2015?


#2687

Yes, I voted for them in 2015.