The Reading Room


#141

My parents copy of “The Gods Themselves…” for me. My copy now, Dave.


#142

For me it was 2000ad :grin:

The first sci-fi book I read was
"To your scattered bodies go" by Philip Jose Farmer
Don’t recall how I came across it, I was probably about 10 at the time


#143

Just on the second of the three Takeshi Kovacs novels.


#144

Yeah. Ask her if she’ll come round and sort my garden out.:deciduous_tree::deciduous_tree::deciduous_tree:


#145

The Ruum.

Didn’t take very long, but brought back fond memories :grin:


#146

Saw this in HMV today. It’s a looks like a really good read for £10 but you need to buy something else to get it for that price. It’s no lightweight in the physical sense either. Might go back in the week and buy a copy.

From Amazon (£26 on there)

Dust & Grooves: Adventures in Record Collecting is an inside look into the world of vinyl record collectors in the most intimate of environments their record rooms. Compelling photographic essays from photographer Eilon Paz are paired with in-depth and insightful interviews to illustrate what motivates these collectors to keep digging for more records. The reader gets an up close and personal look at a variety of well-known vinyl champions, including Gilles Peterson and King Britt, as well as a glimpse into the collections of known and unknown DJs, producers, record dealers, and everyday enthusiasts. Driven by his love for vinyl records, Paz takes us on a five-year journey unearthing the very soul of the vinyl community.


#147

@rmsshipbroker signing tour


#148

Just bought it in local Fopp, for £8, with no extra purchase required.


#149

Waiting for this to arrive. :metal::skull:


#150

#151

Thanks to @Mickyricky for this :+1:


#152


#153

Cracking book.


#154

Just started Perdido Street Station.


#155

Excellent book Mark, and what drew me on to The Scar as being the second book set in the New Crobuzon world.


#156

Since getting a new prescription I’ve got back into reading ,

I’m enjoying this at the mo SX324_BO1%2C204%2C203%2C200
I’m gonna have a good look through the thread for recommendations


#157


How to Make the Rest of Your Family Hate Riding
Coach them on proper technique and critique their performance so they know where they stand.
Insist on proper saddle height even if they’re afraid of not being able to put their feet flat on the ground. Tell them the truth—that pedaling with a too-low saddle will lead to chondromalacia. That will motivate them with worry on top of their fear.
Teach them the wonders of drafting, and be sure to overemphasize the difference it makes at family riding speeds. Make them ride scarily close to your rear wheel. And teach them about rotating pace lines.
Buy them upscale bikes, and remind them how expensive they are. The guilt they’ll feel for not appreciating them is a fantastic motivator.
Make sure they know that expensive bikes make hard hills easy, so when they’re struggling, they’ll think it’s them, and work harder to improve.
Force them to wear lycra shorts and jerseys. This will reinforce how easy and natural it is to just hop on a bike and ride somewhere.
Get them clipless pedals and matching shoes so they have that “locked in” feeling. Emphasize how much easier it is to ride this way, “once they get used to it.”
Point out stellar examples. If you ride in a club with fast women, tell your wife that if she puts some effort into it, she can be like them. If your child is chubby, admire his or her fitter friends.
Give your teenage daughter who doesn’t ride a bike a bracelet or necklace made of a bicycle chain. That will put her in the riding mood for sure.
Race vicariously through your children. Believe you’re doing them a favor by turning play into a lifetime obsession with cardiovascular fitness.

This on order


#158

image


#159

Can’t remember if I posted, but I read More Than Human by Theodore Sturgeon and really enjoyed it. Can’t remember who recommended it and too lazy/drunk to go back and check, but thanks :+1:


#160