Interesting Speakers


#502

Oakland, California - 1925

image


#503

Another picture from Idora Park

One of the largest horn loudspeakers ever built, installed at Idora Park, California amusement park in 1922. This photo shows its presentation to the public, before it was installed. At this time, public address systems, made possible by the development of reliable vacuum tubes during WW1, were new and very low powered, and required horn speakers to get adequate volume. As a publicity stunt, Idora Park installed this large horn to play music concerts and radio programs throughout the park. Built by Magnavox at its Oakland, CA, plant, the speaker was made of spruce, 35 feet long, with a 1 inch throat widening to a 12 foot square mouth at the other end. The speaker was driven by a standard Magnavox compression driver with a metal diaphragm, powered by an tube amplifier with a then unprecedented output power of 47 watts. The huge horn amplified the sound produced by the amplifier so it could reportedly be heard throughout a 29 square mile area.

I wonder what became of it.


#504

Pete probably bought it and is now wondering how many pieces he needs to saw it up into to get it in the house. Or perhaps how many walls/floors he needs to remove.


#505

He could live in it. It’s bigger than his house.


#506


#507

This is how you deal with horns and garages @coco No holes in the ceiling, straight through the wall!


#508

Any idea what AVD would be called amongst meatmen? Patent pending.

GX

**Barefaced AVD - it isn’t a closed or open-backed cab, or even ported - this is brand new patent pending technology. This “ A ugmented V ent D iffractor” has two main functions: **

**1. It allows mid and high frequencies from the rear of the cone to pass through its slot, be diffracted, be coupled to the room by the waveguide, and spread around the room for hugely improved audibility **

2. At low frequencies it acts as a Helmholtz resonator, vastly improving the efficiency and power handling in the lows

https://barefacedaudio.com/products/gx


#509

It’s a waveguide with spin


#510