The Boys' Own Book of Aeroplanes

Currently looking after my Mum found this photo of my Grandad. He worked on models. He worked at BAC Filton and also De Havilland at Hatfield this picture appears from there in early 1960,'s


He is 3rd right with glasses

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It’s a big boy! Not been on one of these before. Getting off the ground is going to be an experience

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They are really airy and remarkably quiet.

Once in the air. Takeoff is a different story!

A bit different to 90 years ago

Skilz

Never knew that the Vulcan was used to test the engines for Concorde.

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Wow, me neither.

Slightly puzzled by the Olympus apparently being on full chat but the air brakes deployed at the same time! Presumably to maximise time over the display area while also blowing-out as many windows as possible!

Can’t get to the article linked - but there were several iterations using obsolete Vulcan B1s to test Olympus engines for TSR2 and Concorde, and later the RB199 for MRCA/Tornado, requiring different installations:

Yours and this were the original TSR2 test-bed (destroyed by an engine fire that same year (1962).)

Second plane with a much more complete Concorde installation:

Think this is the Tornado test pod:

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Fuck, but test pilots have some big cajones

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Ain’t that the truth. Some of the shit they flew in the fifties especially - looked like a kid drew it… :open_mouth:

Mind, they grew-up in a massively-less risk-averse society, and most of them had seen action in WW2 - where AA and other pilots were doing their level best to actively kill them - often with superior hardware, so I guess by comparison peacetime flying in something that (e.g.) looked like a toaster with back-to-front wings was no biggie… :sunglasses:

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Ain’t that the truth; I came across a documentary on these machines a while back.

fucking fuck flying around in these cunting things:

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There’s a coincidence. I came here to avoid crapping even further on another thread, so here’s a repeat of the same plane in the Deutsches Museum in Munich.

Meanwhile, the actual photo I came to post, JU52 over Berlin, October 2002 allegedly

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Marine air terminal at NY LaGuardia, 1940.

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Canberra

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Photographed from a Canberra

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I don’t know why, but I had always imagined a Canberra to be propeller rather than jet.

NASA still use several for high altitude atmospheric research. Quite remarkable considering the type first flew in 1949.

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:+1: I used to work with an ex-Canberra nav, who always claimed it could sustain very high altitude better than almost anything else (bar the obvious U-2, SR-71) - continuing to support those Canberras can’t be easy or cheap, so if NASA could find a better platform they would probably be using it.

Absolutely amazing for an essentially WWII design.

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