Programming

Anyone else here other than @Ijrussell do any programming / development work?

Just getting back into it (Ruby on Rails), thought it would be interesting to see what anyone else is doing.

yes

Do you still get to do any research or are you now fully occupied with faculty level stuff?

yes, but my research is on ethical use of computing.

I am also working on an industrial contract which involves some development in C#.

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Yep, I’m a software engineer in the mobile telecomms industry.
Mostly C/C++ but do a bit of C# / Python / whatever else is needed to glue things together, as you do.

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As someone with one foot in the design camp, that’s a subject that’s very interesting to me. I’d love to know more about what you are doing in that area.

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Yes.

It’s Java all the way down.

I’d like to use Kotlin if anyone would pay me to do it.

When I attempted my CS degree it was primarily taught in Java. Put me right off for quite a while :laughing:

Kotlin looks interesting. Have you ever tried clojure or scala?

Yes, starting to pick up C#

I program the microwave to cook packets of rice does that count?

No, I haven’t.

Although I did work on a project where the “architects” were desperately trying to write Scala in Java :smile:

Did Java for 20+ years with a bit of C++, Groovy, some scripting and other stuff. Now I just to Visio and Powerpoint. :smiley: Honestly, I don’t miss the cuntery of modern developers (which framework is flavour of the week today? :roll_eyes: ) whco know fuck all about actual engineering, but think they’re gods because they taught themselves a bit of JavaScript. Cunts.

Functional programming can suck my dick, too. As far as I can tell it’s main raison d’etre is to allow dickheads to protect their job because it results in utterly unreadable shite. “Expressive” my arse.

Probably should learn Python, though, as it’s used a lot in data science.

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The industry is full of top class cunts

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Not a developer in any shape or form but the latest thing in networking has been SDN (software defined networking) which everyone seems to be trying to learn Python for but I’m avoiding like the plague as it just seems to be a load of old wank.

Yaml seems to be getting used in a lot of the latest Linux server distros as well now.

35+ years man and boy…
started off with basic, moved to 6502 assembler then 68000 and z80. Moved to C, then C++, nowadays languages are 10 a penny and a tool in a toolbox, the language doesn’t really matter any more just the framework / libraries available.That said I currently have direct daily contact with - deep breath - C, C++, C#, Objective-C, Python, JavaScript and lesser contact with Java, and various script / shell things which kids these days like to call languages but aren’t.

@thebiglebowski Yes Python is willfully shit, the use of ‘significant white space’ was one of the most insane decisions ever made, the number of times a bit of library code pasted into a project that uses spaces instead of tabs or vice versa has brought a project to it’s knees with vague error messages is incalculable. Also I’ve not found a Python IDE that I actually enjoy using all of them being a bit fisher price or eclipse.

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my contact is mainly with everything in the C family. A bit of Java. We stopped using Python as a first language with our students. Done my fair share of assembler in anger, and even microcode in binary (when I was working towards my MSc)…! written a few compilers in my time (back in the late 1980s) looking to exploit parallelism in code for targeting the multi-core processor I was designing.

Don’t do alot these days, and I suspect it will be less going forward. I recall with some fondness using Prolog in anger, Modula2, Pascal, Occam and even Ada.

Oh, I’d forgotten Modula2. Learnt that at university.

… and yes, WTF were they thinking with the whitespace in Python? Every time you email someone a snippet of code, or even have the audacity to open the file in a different editor, it gets borked. :exploding_head:

it was a huge favourite as a first language for while.