Sex Pistols

An sure people can add to this as and when and if they can be arsed.

This particular record is a much reduced (half the tracks) varient of the Great rock n roll Swindle. What makes it a bit special is the poster, film quad, if you can find one.

The artwork by Jamie Reid helped define the band and punk at that time,. On top of that it mentions Mary Millington, which is nice :ok_hand::ok_hand:

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I really shouldn’t know who that is. :laughing:
Magazines found in hedges as a youth…

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Mary Millington

I see that name and all I can think of (remember) is a cigar :thinking::muscle::clap::clap::clap:

Somewhere I have both album and poster, both a bit shagged. I couldn’t afford the full monty version.

I’m prolly remembering wrong, but did the album in fact fail to feature any of the main Pistols line-up and was instead played by the various components of what subsequently became ‘Tenpole Tudor’?

I certainly felt cheated when I bought it.
Only saving Grace were the cover songs of

Stepping stone
Roadrunner
Johnny b Goode
And this

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It would be true to say that the album contained no songs recorded by the Sex Pistols, not bad for a soundtrack album from a film about the bloody band :slight_smile:

The original double album, like the film, was made in 79 and Rotten had already left the band. MM found some old recordings of practice tracks from previous recording sessions , took Rotten’s voice from these and dubbed over Cook, Jones and Matlock, thus fooling people into think the Pistols had recoded new material. The rest of the album consisted of solo efforts by Cook, Jones and Vicious (bar one his only studio work), 3 tracks by Tenpole and a bizarre offering by a French Disco outfit.

The following year when the film was released, Virgin then released a single record variant with all the Rotten vocal tracks redacted, the one in the photo above. A number of the early copies of this variant contained the film poster.

I like the film and the soundtrack and if you think of it as an OST rather than a Pistol’s album it makes sense, kind of :slight_smile:

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I must of been so pissed off with the album,that I’ve never heard this til just now
Like a boney m v darts mash up

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I recall it being despised at the time by hardline punks for its inauthenticity, which through the lens of history is kinda funny.

I also recall being given a choice of what came with the album - but not what the choice was; iirc the poster was one of 3 options. Dunno if that was official mind, or just my local record shop.

If you had a one sided single and poster with a copy of NMTB you’d be topping up your watch fund. As for this album, don’t think I’ve seen an Uber expensive varient (test pressing excepted). I suspect the record shop was happy to swap a single out for a poster if there was one with the record, probably make a couple of quid selling the poster separately.

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…and your specialist subject, Mr. Cusworth, is…

Chapeau.

I was that outraged person

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I took all so seriously at the time

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We all did mate. It was bordering on a bloody belief-system, and the camaraderie was beyond anything else I ever experienced.

Now I look at sad, knackered, fat old cunts like myself watching even more knackered fat old cunts playing the tired old anthems at gigs and sounding like Vic Reeves’ “club singer” character, all wearing their £40 T-shirts, and it gives me The Big Sad…

Turned-out there was some future after-all, even if it was a fucking Thatcherite materialist’s wet dream…

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I was a few years too late, I just remember Mary Millington😁 No disappointment.

As punishment I had to live through that first outpuring of Goth.

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While we are at it, you lot, punks of the day that is, never looked after your records, fucked they are, all of them! No fucks given for the plight of future collectors that’s for sure.

As for reunions, I find them all sad affairs, it’s akin to collecting the pension, a self benefits gig.

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I sold all mine around 1980 as I was skint. Dread to think what they are worth now.

Sadly glue,tenants and Tuinal isn’t the best combo for vinyl care.

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^ Almost exactly what he said ^ Except I kept a few records. Trying to hold on to some sort of sense of identity I guess.

I usually stay well-away from the old bands, haven’t played the music in years, and usually stay out of threads like this, too.

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Think the last one i went to see was the stranglers in 2016,before that was pil in 83.

Just feels wrong revisiting it now.
Prefer listening to post punk these days which was far more interesting imo

Although the pistols still excites when a single comes on the radio

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Most of mine ended up in the Hatchet’s juke box (a pub of ill repute in the day, made famous recently for bootng Starmer out).

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Not a hardline punk by any stretch of the imagination but even when I started buying records in ‘81’ 82 ish I used to see TGRn’RS album in the shops and even I thought it was cynical trash with pretty much little merit, and a total false representation entirely aimed at extracting money from the unwitting.

I was far too busy spending my paper round money on Human League et al and imported hip hop 12"s…

Saw the film a couple of years later and it appealed to my 14/15 year old teenage mind though! Still don’t have a copy of the album to this date.