The Milk Float Thread


#361

Japan has coal, and there’s a massive oil pipeline from Siberia. They are looking at building an LNG pipeline from Kazakhstan I think it is. They ship a lot, and it’s expensive. Despite the obvious geology issues, they still are looking to move to pipelines.

What fuel is the solar power converted into? Hydrogen? Are you seriously proposing that ships full of high explosive are more immune to terror attacks than pylons? Lithium batteries? Ditto.

If we can create a useful fuel from CO2 and water plus renewable electricity then it’s all peachy, but I don’t know of any processes that are viewed as remotely technically possible at industrial scale.


#362

Yes they do. In 2016 Japan dug 1.4 million tonnes of coal, up from zero in each of the previous three years (at least). They imported 209.2 million tonnes. So they dug about 0.7% of what they needed then.

The ‘massive oil pipeline’ from Siberia will be supplying some fraction of the oil which generates just 9% of the electricity. So still a drop in the ocean (no pun intended - as you say, pipelines, earthquake zone, hmmm …). My point was not that they might go to piping in some speculative future. It was that they have made shipping work in the real-world past.

No, I’m not proposing hydrogen (check my first post) although others have. Even if I was though, the terrorists would have to blow up a lot of ships (hundreds ?) to shut a country down but hardly any pylons (fewer than ten ?). Plus it’s harder to hit a moving target and you don’t have to sail them through Fanatistan.

That’s OK. You can’t be expected to know everything. Here you go.

VB


#363

Syngas? That has a long way to go to be useful here. You’re proposing totally unproven tech on a fraction of the scale required, rather than a network of cables. I can only assume that you’re trolling.


#364

I can only assume that you don’t have access to an internet search engine

VB


#365

Some interesting reading for the pious…

https://www.whatcar.com/news/electric-vehicle-charging-–-what-does-it-really-cost/n16833


#366

What a mess. In other words, every opportunity for cuntery is being exploited by these charge point providers.


#367

Imagine if you rocked up to a garage forecourt and got half a tank having paid for a full tank. They’d be shut down within a week.


#368

Yup, it stinks, but it’s the future…apparently :frowning:


#369

It’s an early free market, so a massive fuck up right now. I did look into in a while back. You can find maps that give the details of local chargers; each company has a different system of charging. To get the best deals you need to sign up with each and know whether they charge a flat rate or per charge used, and know how long you’re going to be parked there.

While it’s fucking stupid, once you suss it out you’d be fine for your local area. Further afield and it would be bloody annoying though.

I’d like to think that over time it would settle down and stay to make sense, but in practice it’s only when the EU step in that sanity is reached, when the market fails, and presumably that’s never going to happen here. Ho hum.


#370

What EU?


#371

As shown, delivery and stating amounts vary. There appears to be no legislation to control this shit. How can you advertise 43kWh and supply 22 ???


#372

What’s your broadband speed…
:wink:


#373

Ahhhh, promised 25 but actual…


#374

Strewth mate, that’s faster than a kangaroo with a rocket up it’s arse.


#375

Bollinger B1 - 360bhp & 0-60 in 4.6 secs


#376

Prefer a Bowler


#377

All new, never been tested in the field by idiots.


#378

Just discovered that a mate has bought a Tesla model S.

So being a nosey twat I googled prices.

“From £75k”

Fuuuuuuuu …

And here’s me sucking my teeth about a second hand Mini.


#379

You could get a decent watch for that eh Guy? :wink:


#380

if he owns his own business, and it is making decent profits, the tax advantages around them makes them v tax efficient company cars

otherwise there is no reasonable excuse